2019 - 2020 Catalog 
    
    Oct 28, 2020  
2019 - 2020 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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BIOL 201 - Microbiology

4 Credit: (3 lecture, 2 lab, 0 clinical) 5 Contact Hours: [BIOL 100  or BIOL 105  or BIOL 110  or BIOL 115  or BIOL 121  or BIOL 122  or BIOL 202  or BIOL 203 ]


This course is a study of the biology of various microorganisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa and offers the opportunity to observe the roles of these organisms in health and disease as well as their impact on everyday life. Laboratory exercises provide hands-on opportunities to grow and work with a variety of living microorganisms.
OFFERED: fall and spring semesters

Course Goals/ Objectives/ Competencies:
Goal 1:  Explain the organization of microbiology, the basic metabolism of microorganisms and how they are studied and then apply this information in a laboratory setting.

Objectives:

  1. Describe some important historical events where microbes played a key role.
  2. Investigate the basic principles and nomenclature required in the study of microbes.
  3. Describe the basic microbial cell, its components and chemical composition.
  4. Describe metabolism and growth requirements of microbes.
  5. Describe the nutritional requirements and growth conditions of microorganisms.
  6. Describe the basic practices used in microbiology laboratories.
  7. Demonstrate safe laboratory procedures.
  8. Use a microscope properly.
  9. Demonstrate the procedures and equipment used for studying microorganisms including preparing smears, streak plates, a simple stain and the Gram stain.

Goal 2:  Categorize selected microorganisms from each major group (bacteria, protozoa, fungi, helminthes and viruses) based on their characteristics and how they influence human health.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the characteristics and structure of each type of microorganism.
  2. Identify microscopic examples of selected microorganisms.
  3. Describe the disease, signs/symptoms and treatment of selected disease-causing microorganisms.
  4. Compare various microorganisms and determine how characteristics allow for similar treatment and prevention.
  5. Use various tests used to identify microorganisms in the laboratory.

Goal 3:  Explain in detail the preventative measures and immune system processes used against infectious diseases.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the various physical and chemical control methods in slowing microbial growth.
  2. Apply laboratory experiments to determine microbial growth and control.
  3. Explain how drugs work to inhibit microbial growth.
  4. Apply the principles of epidemiology to a selected microbial disease.
  5. Apply the terms nosocomial and zoonosis to diseases.
  6. Describe the nonspecific and specific immune response to microbial infections.
  7. Describe the four types of hypersensitivities and hyposensitivities.
  8. Describe the use and types of vaccines produced against microbial diseases.

Goal 4:  Apply the DNA sequence and complementarity to the concepts of DNA replication, gene expression and biotechnology applications.

Objectives:

  1. Describe DNA replication, transcription and translation.
  2. Explain gene expression using the central dogma of cell biology.
  3. Apply knowledge of transcriptional regulation to a selected gene.
  4. Describe the importance of lactose in the lac operon system.
  5. Perform transformation and electrophoresis in lab.
  6. Diagram a restriction enzyme digest of a given piece of DNA.
  7. Illustrate examples of transgenic organisms and their use or value to humans.
  8. Explain the value of selected biotechnology applications to humankind (electrophoresis, PCR, Microarray analysis, etc.).

Goal 5:  Diagram microbial processes used in environmental, industrial, food and agricultural applications.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the role of microbes in their ecosystems (i.e. role in the water, carbon, nitrogen cycles and ecosystem balance).
  2. Explain uses of microbes in the environment (wetlands, bioremediation, composting, etc.).
  3. Discuss how beer, wine and bread and selected other fermented food products are produced.
  4. Compare public sewage systems and septic systems and the use of microbes in these processes.
  5. Test water and food (in the lab) for the presence of microbes.
  6. Apply water potability information to human use of that water.
  7. Explain ways human food is made safer for consumption.
  8. Describe the role of microbes in agriculture applications (i.e. ruminants, silage, etc.)

Goal 6: Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method used in microbiology.

Objectives:

  1. Define hypothesis and independent, dependent and control variables.
  2. List characteristics of good scientific methodology and experimentation.
  3. Perform the steps of the scientific method in a class experiment.
  4. Identify variables, controls and constants in a class experiment.
  5. Draw valid conclusions from collected data.
  6. Discuss applications of microbial research for industry, health and environmental applications.



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